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Total Articles 55 - 63 of 3432 | Total Books 1 |

Zimbabwe?s Government of National Unity: Harvest of Thorns?

Author(s):Tawanda Zinyama -- Prosper E.T. Takavarasha
Journal: International Journal of Asian Social Science
Publisher:
Abstract
| Pages: 444-459
National governments have sovereign mandates to provide basic goods and services to the citizenry. This study seeks to find out the citizenry?s opinion regarding the general performance of the Government of National Unity (GNU). Study findings suggest that while the GNU has made commendable socio-economic progress from 2009 to 2011, from thereon, there was serious socio-economic deceleration characterised by low business and investor confidence, continued de-industrialisation, little growth and employment generation, policy inconsistencies and uncertainties, the ?stop-go?? constitution-making process, and apparent stalling of the national healing and reconciliation process. Scenarios aground strongly suggest that the GNU has been dogged by deep-seated structural and situational challenges. It appears to be reaping more thorns than benefits. Against this backdrop, the paper recommends that policy makers should have sound knowledge in the principles of good governance and economic management in order to strengthen the capacity of the various institutions of governance and improve industrial competitiveness. This is particularly needed to address the ?haemorrhage? in the manufacturing sector and macro-economic instability. There is also need for the training of legislators in areas of policy formulation, budget analysis and communication skills.

A Method for Negotiating Various Customer Requirements for Public Service Design

Author(s):Yoshiki Shimomura -- Yutaro Nemoto -- Fumiya Akasaka -- Koji Kimita
Journal: Axioms
Publisher:
Abstract
| Pages: 1-9
A method for public service design, which enables designers to realize high-value added service design by considering plural different customer groups in parallel, is proposed. In General, service designs focus on specific customers. However, because of the diversity of customer requirements, it is difficult to design a public service that addresses the requirements of all customers. To achieve higher customer satisfaction, it is imperative to summarize the requirements of various customers and design a service by considering customers belonging to different categories. In this article, we propose a method that enables highly public service development by considering groups of various customers and minimizing customer dissatisfaction by adopting a group-decision-making approach. As a consequence, improvement of effectiveness of highly public service development can be expected.

Business Decision-Making Using Geospatial Data: A Research Framework and Literature Review

Author(s):Michael A. Erskine -- Dawn G. Gregg -- Jahangir Karimi -- Judy E. Scott
Journal: Axioms
Publisher:
Abstract
| Pages: 10-30
Organizations that leverage their increasing volume of geospatial data have the potential to enhance their strategic and organizational decisions. However, literature describing the best techniques to make decisions using geospatial data and the best approaches to take advantage of geospatial data’s unique visualization capabilities is limited. This paper reviews the use of geospatial visualization and its effects on decision performance, which is one of the many components of decision-making when using geospatial data. Additionally, this paper proposes a comprehensive model allowing researchers to better understand decision-making using geospatial data and provides a robust foundation for future research. Finally, this paper makes an argument for further research of information-presentation, task-characteristics, user-characteristics and their effects on decision-performance when utilizing geospatial data.

Second-Order Risk Constraints in Decision Analysis

Author(s):Love Ekenberg -- Mats Danielson -- Aron Larsson -- David Sundgren
Journal: Axioms
Publisher:
Abstract
| Pages: 31-45
Recently, representations and methods aimed at analysing decision problems where probabilities and values (utilities) are associated with distributions over them (second-order representations) have been suggested. In this paper we present an approach to how imprecise information can be modelled by means of second-order distributions and how a risk evaluation process can be elaborated by integrating procedures for numerically imprecise probabilities and utilities. We discuss some shortcomings of the use of the principle of maximising the expected utility and of utility theory in general, and offer remedies by the introduction of supplementary decision rules based on a concept of risk constraints taking advantage of second-order distributions.

The Three Laws of Thought, Plus One: The Law of Comparisons

Author(s):Thomas L. Saaty
Journal: Axioms
Publisher:
Abstract
| Pages: 46-49
The rules of logic are nearly 2500 years old and date back to Plato and Aristotle who set down the three laws of thought: identity, non-contradiction, and excluded middle. The use of language and logic has been adequate for us to develop mathematics, prove theorems, and create scientific knowledge. However, the laws of thought are incomplete. We need to extend our logical system by adding to the very old laws of thought an essential yet poorly understood law. It is a necessary law of thought that resides in our biology even deeper than the other three laws. It is related to the rudiments of how we as living beings, and even nonliving things, respond to influences as stimuli. It helps us discriminate between being ourselves and sensing that there is something else that is not ourselves that even amoebas seem to know. It is the intrinsic ability to sense and distinguish. This fourth law is the law of comparisons. Although it has been missing from our logical deductions it underlies the other three laws of thought because without it we cannot know what is and what is not.

A Hybrid Artificial Reputation Model Involving Interaction Trust, Witness Information and the Trust Model to Calculate the Trust Value of Service Providers

Author(s):Gurdeep Singh Ransi -- Ziad Kobti
Journal: Axioms
Publisher:
Abstract
| Pages: 50-63
Agent interaction in a community, such as the online buyer-seller scenario, is often uncertain, as when an agent comes in contact with other agents they initially know nothing about each other. Currently, many reputation models are developed that help service consumers select better service providers. Reputation models also help agents to make a decision on who they should trust and transact with in the future. These reputation models are either built on interaction trust that involves direct experience as a source of information or they are built upon witness information also known as word-of-mouth that involves the reports provided by others. Neither the interaction trust nor the witness information models alone succeed in such uncertain interactions. In this paper we propose a hybrid reputation model involving both interaction trust and witness information to address the shortcomings of existing reputation models when taken separately. A sample simulation is built to setup buyer-seller services and uncertain interactions. Experiments reveal that the hybrid approach leads to better selection of trustworthy agents where consumers select more reputable service providers, eventually helping consumers obtain more gains. Furthermore, the trust model developed is used in calculating trust values of service providers.

On Transcendental Numbers

Author(s):Florin F. Nichita
Journal: Axioms
Publisher:
Abstract
| Pages: 64-69
Transcendental numbers play an important role in many areas of science. This paper contains a short survey on transcendental numbers and some relations among them. New inequalities for transcendental numbers are stated in Section 2 and proved in Section 4. Also, in relationship with these topics, we study the exponential function axioms related to the Yang-Baxter equation.

Canonical Coordinates for Retino-Cortical Magnification

Author(s):Luc Florack
Journal: Axioms
Publisher:
Abstract
| Pages: 70-81
A geometric model for a biologically-inspired visual front-end is proposed, based on an isotropic, scale-invariant two-form field. The model incorporates a foveal property typical of biological visual systems, with an approximately linear decrease of resolution as a function of eccentricity, and by a physical size constant that measures the radius of the geometric foveola, the central region characterized by maximal resolving power. It admits a description in singularity-free canonical coordinates generalizing the familiar log-polar coordinates and reducing to these in the asymptotic case of negligibly-sized geometric foveola or, equivalently, at peripheral locations in the visual field. It has predictive power to the extent that quantitative geometric relationships pertaining to retino-cortical magnification along the primary visual pathway, such as receptive field size distribution and spatial arrangement in retina and striate cortex, can be deduced in a principled manner. The biological plausibility of the model is demonstrated by comparison with known facts of human vision.

Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Axioms in 2013

Author(s):Axioms Editorial Office
Journal: Axioms
Publisher:
Abstract
| Pages: 82-83
The editors of Axioms would like to express their sincere gratitude to the following reviewers for assessing manuscripts in 2013. [...]
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